Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Bye Bye Blackbird: From Fosse

Best Screen Kiss

The New York Times showed some good ones this week although some were more pecks or jokes than kisses.I liked Rosaria Dawson and Jenny Slater's the best.

http://www.comingsoon.net/extras/news/391421-new-york-times-gets-this-years-best-actors-for-9-kisses

There are so many great ones on the big screen. But the small screen usually gives us the added twist of a kiss perhaps taking years to come--like this one.




What is your favorite on screen kiss? Big or small screen.

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Bye Bye Blackbird: Joe Cocker

Forgotten Movies: LARCENY, INC



Directed by Lloyd Bacon, this early forties comedy tells the story of three recent paroled criminals who buy a luggage shop in order to tunnel through to the bank next door. A pretty familiar plot nowadays but perhaps less common then.

It doesn't matter though because the movie is played for laughs and takes a lot of unexpected turns. The street the shop is on is being dug up for a new line of the NY subway, which adds to the confusion. The writing is sharp (S.J. Perlman) and the acting and directing is swell.

At 93 minutes it felt a tad long but its Christmas theme fit right in with the season, so we didn't mind much. Jack Carson as a love interest? Jane Wyman as a blonde?

Monday, December 15, 2014

Bye Bye Blackbird: Julie London

Too grim for me

There are not too many movies that are too grim for me. I think I can tolerate gloomier fare than most people although I find it easier to read gloomy books than to see such movies. But tonight I bailed on OUT OF THE FURNACE. I put an hour in before escaping.

I think this was probably a good movie but if I find no hope, if the people are too evil, if the good men never win, I eventually either turn off or take off.

What movie was too grim for you? (This is not a criticism of the quality of the film but just my tolerance for it)

Saturday, December 13, 2014

Friday, December 12, 2014

Happy Birthday, Mr. Sinatra-


Friday's Forgotten Books, Friday, December 12, 2014



THE LOST LANGUAGE OF CRANES, David Leavitt.

Published in the 1980s, I read this in 1992. The Lost Language of Cranes tells the story of twenty-five-year-old Philip Benjamin, who comes out to his parents when he falls in love with a man. Philip’s parents have their own problems: pressure from developers and the loss of their home. But Philip’s father’s own struggle with his suppressed homosexuality, realized only in Sunday afternoon visits to gay porn theaters, is the real heartbreak in the story.

The book does a good job in detailing the difference in society's reaction to the issue of homosexuality. His father was never permitted to act on his desires in any satisfying way. 

There is also a good filmed version of this story.


Sergio Angelini, BURY ME DEEP, Harold Q. Masur
Mark Baker, MT. RANIER, Sandy Dengler
Joe Barone, A MIND TO MURDER, P.D. James
Brian Busby, Christmas Offerings
Bill Crider, THE COMPLEAT TRAVELLER IN BLACK, John Bruner
Martin Edwards, FAVORITE BOOKS ABOUT CRIME FICTION
Curt Evans, TWO LITTLE RICH GIRLS, Mignon Eberhart
Ed Gorman, FAKE I.D. , Jason Starr
Rick Horton, THE ADVENTURES OF RICHARD HANNAY, John Buchan
Jerry House, THE DARKLING, David Kesterton
Randy Johnson, MUSIC FOR THE DEAD, Luis Gutierrez Maluenda
George Kelley, MURDER, MAYHEM AND MISTLETOE
B.F. Lawson, MURDER BEFORE MATINS, John Reeves
Evan Lewis, SCARAMOUCHE, Rafael Sabatini
Steve Lewis, GOOD NIGHT AND GOODBYE, Timothy Harris
Margot Kinberg, VANISH, Tess Gerritsen
Rob Kitchin, KEYSTONE, Peter Lovesey
Tracy K, THE JASMINE TRADE, Denise Hamilton
Todd Mason
Neer, THE SCHIRMER INHERITANCE, Eric Ambler
J.F. Norris, THE SHOP WINDOW MURDERS, Vernon Loder
James Reasoner, SUICIDE RANCH, Ed Earl Repp
Gerard Saylor, THE OUTPOST, Jake Tapper
Kevin Tipple, TOO LATE TO DIE, Bill Crider
TomCat, A HOLE FOR SOMEONE ELSE, De Waal and Baantjer
Prashant Trikannad, WAR AGAINST THE MAFIA, Don Pendleton
Zybahn